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Content Source: NASA.COM

NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART), successfully impacted its asteroid target on Monday after spending 10 months in space. 

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At 7:14 p.m. EDT, the successful impact was announced by mission control at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland. 

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DART's collision with the asteroid Dimorphos illustrates a workable mitigation approach for defending the globe from an Earth-bound asteroid or comet, should one be identified, as part of NASA's wider planetary defense strategy. 

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NASA Administrator remarked, "At its core, DART marks an extraordinary success for planetary security, but it is also a mission of unity with a tangible benefit for all humanity.

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In addition to studying the cosmos and our home planet, NASA is also striving to defend it. 

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This worldwide partnership turned science fiction into science fact and illustrated one strategy to protect Earth.

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The mission's successful one-way flight demonstrated that NASA can steer a spacecraft to kinetically contact an asteroid in order to divert it.

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The study team will now use ground-based telescopes to observe Dimorphos in order to verify that the asteroid's orbit around Didymos was altered by the impact of DART. 

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One of the main goals of the full-scale test is to properly measure how much the asteroid was deflected. 

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Scientists anticipate that the hit will reduce Dimorphos' orbit by about 1%, or roughly 10 minutes.

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Who lives on Earth is impacted by Planetary Defense, according to Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

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All we need to do to significantly alter an asteroid's course is to slightly alter its speed.